Two for Tuesday: Olympic Ads

The Olympics are the hottest topic right now, and the entire world is tuning in to watch. With so many eyes glued to the screens during broadcasts, marketers are taking the opportunity to make bold statements and tug on our heartstrings. This Two-for-Tuesday, let’s take a look at two noteworthy Olympic ads:

Chevy #TheNew

 

 

Chevy’s #TheNew Olympic ads are said to be the first to air during any Olympic games that feature same-sex couples. This commercial is part of Chevy’s New Us campaign, where it presents a new line up of cars for a changing world, as society’s ideas of life and love are continuing to evolve to become more inclusive. “If you know what you stand for, you know where you’re going,” is the tagline of the spot, inviting consumers to share what’s new for them with the hashtag #TheNew on social media.

Procter & Gamble “Thank You, Mom”

 

 

P&G’s “Thanks You, Mom” Olympic ads feature young children tripping and falling during practices for winter sports and their mothers following closely behind, picking them up and dusting them off. An emotional campaign that reminds us Olympians don’t get to compete in the games all by themselves, the Thank You, Mom campaign made quite the splash on social media: Olympians such as Gracie Gold thanked their moms; others who took offense to the ad, voiced the ads inherent sexism. Not to say that mothers don’t play an integral part in nurturing children–certainly they do–but there are plenty of fathers working to make their kids the best they can be, as well.

 

These advertisements underline the humanity of the games. They remind us that every Olympian has a story, a family and a future. Though the world is changing, these advertisements acknowledge the final frontier: humanity and an acceptance, appreciation and understanding of one another.

Cover Photo Source:  GTeam

Mary is an Assistant Account Executive at SJG. She earned her BA in Communication from the University of Evansville in 2013. In her spare time, when she’s not engulfing novels in a coffee shop, Mary feels most at home celebrating life and love with her family and friends, and visiting the streets of Paris in her dreams.